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When I began college with a humanities degree, I felt like I was letting down the female gender by not being a Girl in STEM or a Girl Who Codes. I started worrying that I was slipping at the opportunity to “empower myself” by breaking into the male-dominated field and proving the statistics wrong. But the more I thought about it, the more I wondered: would I truly be empowered if I were to thrust myself into a field I hated just to wear the Empowered cloak? …


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Photo by Max Cavallari.

When the first generation of the iPhone was released, there seemed to be a familiar phrase reverberating in businesses, homes, schools, and all other spaces suddenly enlightened by the possibilities of this new, shiny black screen: “there’s an app for that!” This exclamation accurately represented the optimism of the time, a period that epitomized the seemingly endless possibilities of the Digital Age.

The smartphone and similar highly networked personal devices have steadily developed in the name of efficiency and connection, promising to progress society by making lives easier. …


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Courtesy of Incite Journal, 2018.

I didn’t come to Duke with rose-colored glasses. I knew about the plethora of silenced sexual assault cases on elite college campuses, I knew that the hook-up culture from high school would only grow in a new environment of complete independence, and I expected the unequal treatment of women and girls to remain about the same. But if anything, I assumed that in a place that boasted a certain intellectual and social maturity of the so-called “best and brightest,” there would be an elevated awareness and more energy to enact change.

While getting ready for the Women’s March last January…


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Ida Lupino is regarded as one of the first well-known female directors.

I began making films when I was about eight years old, when my idea of fun on a Saturday consisted of filming my friends and I crossdressing because we didn’t have enough people to play all of the parts in our overly ambitious scripts. I saved up for a tiny blue Canon point-and-shoot after seeing “2001: A Space Odyssey” at my neighborhood drive-in. I was enamored by how purposeful each element of light, sound, and visual composition was to the meaning of the work. …


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In recent years, popular discourse on highly networked personal technology has focused on understanding the balance between accelerating efficiency and relying too heavily on intelligent devices. In Katherine Hayles’ “Unfinished Work: From Cyborg to Cognisphere,” she argues that the way we understand technology is shifting from a binary model of the “cyborg” to an interconnected “cognisphere.” That is, she argues that the individual is no longer a sufficient unit of analysis for today’s computational ecosystem because the systems which currently dominate are intricately networked. …


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Tierra Whack by Spotify Genuis. 2019.

My first exposure to female rap was Lauryn Hill’s “MTV Unplugged №2.0,” which would buzz from my mother’s vinyl most days after school.

I remember feeling that there was something inherently different about Hill, that she held some kind of secret that could only be revealed by letting each interlude play its course. Even as a kid, I felt something in Hill’s acoustics, something rich in the rasp of her voice. And while she became the first woman to be nominated in 10 categories in a single year of the Grammys, her success did not absolve her from the cultural…


What a book covered in flowers taught me about capitalism and sanity.

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I spent this summer in New York, a cesspool of sights, sounds, and — mostly to its detriment — smells. Armed with a class and an internship and living just a few blocks from Union Square, my days filled quickly. Coming from Duke, I was used to this nonstop mindset, this rapid pace of living. It wasn’t until attending a poetry reading at a bookshop on Prince Street that I began to understand what this excessive busyness seemed to be leading me toward. A book with pink flowers…


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As a final project for a course exploring New York City, I wrote a collection of poems in an attempt to parse the idiosyncrasies that lie beneath the sensory overload of such a potent city. I started by dousing myself in the words of classic New York poets. I spent several days in McNally Jackson and Strand like a child let loose in a candy store. While by no means an exhaustive list, I was able to soak up the energy of writers such as Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O’Hara, and Eileen Myles. I challenged myself to visit places…


#BlackLivesMatter. #MeToo. #NeverAgain. #NoDAPL. #NoBanNoWall. New week, new movement. The tweets stream in, evidence of progress…right? But after a few days, when the headlines drop and a more trendy cause emerges, the taps and likes divert. With media traveling at such a rapid pace and providing an unprecedented abundance of information, each movement only lives in the spotlight momentarily, leaving no room for long-term change. While it is true that there are certain exceptional change-makers dedicated constantly to their cause, this sadly is not the truth en masse. Welcome to 2018, where caring is trendy but apathy reigns. This paradox…


by Joslynn Sanchez and Miranda Gershoni

In 2018, nothing could be more trendy than being ~woke~, especially among many upper-middle class circles of white girls who revere their friends’ wokeness as a kind of Bohemian edge, a character trait similar to that gained when one’s friend spends her summer “saving the children” in Africa. While this newfound talkpiece is fun and hip for some, it’s origins and goals are all too real and inescapable for those being marginalized. As a white woman, I felt it was crucial to explore the issue of how whiteness clouds one of the most important…

Miranda Gershoni

Duke 22

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